Skip to main content

The vines flower in the month of June and the grains start to form. The harvest takes place towards the end of September and the grapes are pressed within a few hours of harvesting. Four thousand kilos of grapes yield 2550 litres of grape juice or grape must, which is decanted for twelve hours. This is the first fermentation that will transform the grape juice into wine. This process takes place over several weeks. The wines are then clarified by successive rackings during the winter and tasted. The elaboration of Champagne wines begins with the arrival of spring and the preparation of the vintage.

Once the vintage is blended, ferments are added as well as a small quantity of sugar for the second fermentation. The wine is bottled, capped and laid on laths in cellars that have been dug into the chalk. The transformation of the sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas ensures the formation of bubbles (prise de mousse). The gas is trapped, creating fine bubbles.

The vines flower in the month of June and the grains start to form. The harvest takes place towards the end of September and the grapes are pressed within a few hours of harvesting. Four thousand kilos of grapes yield 2550 litres of grape juice or grape must, which is decanted for twelve hours. This is the first fermentation that will transform the grape juice into wine. This process takes place over several weeks. The wines are then clarified by successive rackings during the winter and tasted. The elaboration of Champagne wines begins with the arrival of spring and the preparation of the vintage.

Once the vintage is blended, ferments are added as well as a small quantity of sugar for the second fermentation. The wine is bottled, capped and laid on laths in cellars that have been dug into the chalk. The transformation of the sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas ensures the formation of bubbles (prise de mousse). The gas is trapped, creating fine bubbles.

TThe vines flower in the month of June and the grains start to form. The harvest takes place towards the end of September and the grapes are pressed within a few hours of harvesting. Four thousand kilos of grapes yield 2550 litres of grape juice or grape must, which is decanted for twelve hours. This is the first fermentation that will transform the grape juice into wine. This process takes place over several weeks. The wines are then clarified by successive rackings during the winter and tasted. The elaboration of Champagne wines begins with the arrival of spring and the preparation of the vintage.

Once the vintage is blended, ferments are added as well as a small quantity of sugar for the second fermentation. The wine is bottled, capped and laid on laths in cellars that have been dug into the chalk. The transformation of the sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide gas ensures the formation of bubbles (prise de mousse). The gas is trapped, creating fine bubbles.

Ageing takes place in the cellar for an average of 5 to 6 years. The second fermentation causes a deposit that adheres to the sides of the bottles. This still has to be removed. To do so, the bottles are placed on clearing racks with the necks slightly tilted downward. Riddling (remuage) consists of slightly rotating each bottle during a period of several weeks. The deposit detaches and collects in the neck, while the bottle is gradually brought to the vertical position. Once the deposit has accumulated behind the cork, it still has to be eliminated: this process is called disgorging. The deposit is trapped by the formation of a small plug of ice and is expelled by the pressure when the cap is removed.

Ageing takes place in the cellar for an average of 5 to 6 years. The second fermentation causes a deposit that adheres to the sides of the bottles. This still has to be removed. To do so, the bottles are placed on clearing racks with the necks slightly tilted downward. Riddling (remuage) consists of slightly rotating each bottle during a period of several weeks. The deposit detaches and collects in the neck, while the bottle is gradually brought to the vertical position. Once the deposit has accumulated behind the cork, it still has to be eliminated: this process is called disgorging. The deposit is trapped by the formation of a small plug of ice and is expelled by the pressure when the cap is removed.

TThe wine takes on its perfectly clear appearance. The space left by disgorging is filled by the liqueur de dosage, a mixture of cane sugar and old wine. The bottle is then closed with its cork stopper which is held in place by a wire cage. There is nothing more to do than to dress the bottle before delivery.

TThe wine takes on its perfectly clear appearance. The space left by disgorging is filled by the liqueur de dosage, a mixture of cane sugar and old wine. The bottle is then closed with its cork stopper which is held in place by a wire cage. There is nothing more to do than to dress the bottle before delivery.

Shopping Cart

En continuant à utiliser le site, vous acceptez l’utilisation des cookies. Plus d’informations

Les paramètres des cookies sur ce site sont définis sur « accepter les cookies » pour vous offrir la meilleure expérience de navigation possible. Si vous continuez à utiliser ce site sans changer vos paramètres de cookies ou si vous cliquez sur "Accepter" ci-dessous, vous consentez à cela.

Fermer